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Wednesday, 19 January 2011 11:47

Fort Augustus

Fort Augustus is a settlement in the Scottish Highlands, at the south west end of Loch Ness. The village has a population of around 646 (2001); its economy is heavily reliant on tourism.

Until the early 18th century the settlement was called Kiliwhimin, and the Gaelic name for the modern village is still Cill Chuimein. It was renamed 'Fort Augustus' after the unsuccessful Jacobite Rising of 1715. The accepted etymology is that the settlement was originally named after Saint Cummein of Iona who built a church there. Other suggestions are that it was originally called Ku Chuimein after one of two abbots of Iona of the Comyn clan, whose badge Lus mhic Chuimein refers to the cumin plant, or that it was called Cill a' Chuimein ("Comyn's Burialplace") after the last Comyn in Lochaber.
Published in Towns and Cities
Thursday, 25 November 2010 23:33

Alloway

Alloway is a village on the outskirts of Ayr and is famous for being the birthplace of Scotland’s Baird, Robert Burns. You can visit the home in which Burns was born, restored to the way it looked when Burns was a child. Visiting his childhood home is almost like the beginning of a pilgrimage for many Burns enthusiast and fans.

Alloway is the setting of one of Burns’ most famous poems, Tam o’ Shanter.  For anyone who has read the poem, taking a walk around the village can be very entertaining. To learn more about Burns and the Tam o’ Shanter poem, there is also a visitor centre with a Tam o’ Shanter experience, it is best to do this before you tour the village.  After visiting Burns Cottage and visiting the centre, you can visit the Auld Kirk, where Tam saw the witches dancing with the “deil”. You can also visit the Brig o’ Doon , a late medieval bridge over the pretty river Doon, where Tam’s poor horse Meg loses her tail, when they manage to escape the Nannie witch.  A Burns monument and gardens finish off a tour of the village quite nicely.

Published in Towns and Cities
Wednesday, 24 November 2010 13:29

Largs

Largs, ideally situated on the Firth of Clyde is a popular tourism destination in Scotland. The town boasts its own fabulous attractions and activities but is also within manageable commute to other Scottish tourist destinations such as Burn's Ayrshire, The islands of Bute, Cumbrae and Arran, the City of Glasgow and Loch Lomond and the Trossachs.

Published in Towns and Cities